Review: Vegan in Europe by Happy Herbivore

posted in: Blog, Book Reviews, Vegan | 25

Let me start by saying that I’m a big fan of the Happy Herbivore blog and cookbooks. If you aren’t familiar, Lindsay Nixon is the author of several cookbooks – The Happy Herbivore Cookbook, Everyday Happy Herbivore, and Happy Herbivore Light and Lean, to name a few. Lindsay is a whole foods, plant-based chef who focuses on vegan, healthy, oil-free recipes that are delicious. While I’m a huge fan of the cooking aspect of Happy Herbivore, Lindsay also loves to travel. She travels extensively throughout Europe, which has included six month-long stints in 40 cities and 23 countries! Furthermore, the Happy Herbivore recipes tend to be fairly straight forward with ingredients that are easy to acquire no matter where you are in the world, as Lindsay is familiar with cooking in many different kitchens all over the place. There is even a Happy Herbivore cookbook that merges plant-based cooking with travel called Happy Herbivore Abroad.

The latest endeavour for Happy Herbivore is an E-book called Vegan in Europe. I am delighted to review it for you here at Justin Plus Lauren. It really is the perfect book to review for our site; after all, Justin and I are both vegans and we love to travel! This book is a travel companion guide for anyone who is following a vegetarian, vegan, or plant-based diet and wants more information about how to maintain that lifestyle while traveling throughout Europe.

After browsing through the entire book, I can tell you with confidence that this is an essential guide for anyone who wants to eat as a vegan in Europe! It takes much of the guess work out of finding suitable items at grocery stores to purchase and which restaurants are the best ones to eat a vegetarian meal. I’m sure that you can find a lot of this information online through hours of research, but it is incredibly convenient to have everything all in one place – Lindsay has already done the research through her experiences. Vegan in Europe details phrases in many different languages to help you order your meal properly to ensure that no meat or dairy will be added. There are lists of traditional foods that are “accidentally vegan” and warnings for when meat/eggs/dairy might be hidden in meals. Lindsay even provides packing tips, airline food recommendations, and a list of snack foods to bring along to ensure that you don’t go hungry.

There are specific vegan guides for many European countries: England, Ireland, Scotland, Denmark, Finland, Norway, Sweden, Croatia, Czech Republic, Hungary, Poland, Slovakia, Slovenia, Turkey, Austria, Belgium, France, Germany, Luxembourg, Monaco, Netherlands, Switzerland, Gibraltar, Italy, Portugal, and Spain. Personally, I am interested mostly in the Italy section as that’s the next place that we’re headed. For Italy, she describes the meals that are typically already vegan at many restaurants and ones that can easily be made vegan. There are detailed lists of restaurants in Florence, Milan, Rome, and Venice. In Italy, Lindsay lists the various places where you can find vegan gelato, as well as chain restaurants that are vegan-friendly. There are also brand names of snacks, chocolate, meat substitutes, dairy substitutes, and cereal that are vegan and can be found at the grocery stores there. Each country has a similar listing of restaurants, phrases in the native language, detailed descriptions, and much more.

For a limited time, you can purchase Vegan in Europe for just $5.99 until the price is raised to its regular cost of $9.99. This is a total bargain! The information is incredibly valuable, especially if you are booking a trip soon and you’re at a loss for how to keep up your healthy, vegetarian diet while you’re abroad. Many of the restaurants listed in the guide aren’t easily searchable on Google and are mainly frequented by locals. Even though some of the restaurants may change over time, the overall information will remain relevant for years to come (and hopefully many of the restaurants listed stay in business!). I’m very happy that I was able to find such a great book and I hope that you find it useful, too. There’s a free sample of the book to view on the website, so check it out and see if it’s right for you. I am very pleased with the book and I highly recommend that you get a copy for yourself.

Disclaimer: I was provided with a copy of Vegan in Europe to review for our site. I do not earn any income from the sales of Vegan in Europe, and I am not involved with any affiliate programs for the E-Book. All opinions in this article are completely my own.

25 Responses

  1. Jessica Meddows
    | Reply

    I’m not going to be in Europe any time in the near future, but I like the sound of the oil free cooking. I feel like I’m cooking way too much in oil, and don’t know how to cook without compromising on the taste. Do you know which of her books is the oil free one?

    • Lauren | Justin Plus Lauren
      | Reply

      All of her books are oil-free! They feature really healthy recipes that are pretty quick and easy to make I find. I think you’ll really enjoy them!

  2. Katie@From Shores to Skylines
    | Reply

    Looks like an awesome guide on vegan eating in Europe! I bet it’s difficult to stay vegan on the road!!

    • Lauren | Justin Plus Lauren
      | Reply

      I haven’t found it to be bad at all in North America, though I’m confident now that it won’t be too bad in Europe either! We’ll have some official reports when we return from Italy next year ๐Ÿ™‚

  3. Mytanfeet
    | Reply

    I’m not vegan but I’d imagine it might be hard to find vegan food in unfamiliar countries so this is going to be super helpful for anyone who is in that position!

  4. Claudia Luxembourg
    | Reply

    So. I am not vegetarian. Nor vegan. Not ever going to be but I appreciate vegan meals. I am also Italian and I can promise you won’t have a hard time finding vegan food here. I have lots of vegan friends that never have a hard time. You can shop in supermarkets – aside from the organic stores where there are tons of vegan products (tofu, soya products, etc), even the main groceries stores have vegan stuff. We are not big on categorizing food in restaurants according to what is vegan or vegetarian (the UK is great for this), but if you read the ingredients you can figure it out. Ie pizza: marinara pizza only has the base, tomato sauce, oregano and garlic. So go for it. A million salads items. Minestrone soup. Pasta e ceci (pasta with garbanzo beans). Lots of pasta dishes with vegetables. Even gelato can be vegan without having to opt for the one that is made with rice or soya milk. Good ice cream parlours have a whole separate section for lactose free gelato – they are normally fruit flavours (strawberry, peach, etc) and some even have dark chocolate flavours which are delicious and only have fruit or chocolate and water added. Go for it! Enjoy!

    PS. I think most cities have vegan restaurants too. Cagliari in Sardinia definitely has a couple.

    • Dale_anglo
      | Reply

      Having eaten my fair share of vegetarian and vegan food in Italy, I can second this.

      Italy and veganism go together so well once you know where to look.

      • Claudia Luxembourg
        | Reply

        There already are a couple of vegan restaurants in my home town – Cagliari. And one more has just opened.

    • Lauren
      | Reply

      Wow, thank you for all of the valuable info!! We aren’t too concerned about finding food but you have definitely reassured us! Thank you!!
      Lauren recently posted…My Top 5 Destinations to RevisitMy Profile

  5. The Crowded Planet
    | Reply

    Sounds like a really great book! I’m always on the look out for healthy recipes, and the sound of oil-free is rather appealing (even to an Italian like me!)

  6. East Meets West Veg
    | Reply

    Sounds like a very helpful book!!

  7. Hannah Logan
    | Reply

    wow how helpful! One of my friends has food restrictions and it’s always a worry when travelling. Books like these are fantastic ideas.

  8. Raphael Alexander Zoren
    | Reply

    I imagine it would be way harder in Latin America ๐Ÿ˜ฎ

  9. Megan Claire
    | Reply

    Interesting – thanks for sharing. My husband has just learned he is gluten free so we appreciate ow difficult it is for people to travel internationally with specific food requirements. Sounds like a great book!

    • Lauren
      | Reply

      Yes, I can appreciate how difficult it can be with gluten-free stuff as my best friend has to eat gluten-free! It is very easy for cross-contamination. Thankfully, restaurants and establishments are starting to have gluten-free menus in some restaurants, which is great!
      Lauren recently posted…Voluntourism Opportunities at Go Global Expo in TorontoMy Profile

  10. Chris Boothman
    | Reply

    Definitely sounds like a great read especially for someone who is looking to travel around Europe and is a vegan. I can’t say that I am so I probably wouldn’t appreciate the book as much as someone else, but it’s nice to know that people are producing books like this! We need to have all angles covered when traveling.

  11. Karyn @ Not Done Travelling
    | Reply

    This book sounds awesome! I had heard that there are some parts of Europe that are difficult to be vegan in, such as provincial France, so this book sounds like a wealth of knowledge.

Leave a Reply

CommentLuv badge